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Conor McGregor ‘happier’ at welterweight, but not done at lightweight according to manager

Conor McGregor has been fighting a 145, 155 and 170 and according to his manager, Audie Attar his client is much happier at welterweight.

The Irishman made his return to the Octagon in the main event of UFC 246 and knocked out Donald Cerrone in just 40 seconds. It was a dominating performance by McGregor and Attar says he the Irishman is healthier at 170 so he hopes he stays there but doesn’t rule out a return to 155 or even 145.

“I look at all my clients as human beings and I’ve seen him at 145, 155 and 170 in mixed martial arts and he just appears to be a lot happier at 170,” Attar told MMA Fighting. “It’s not as strenuous on the body as it relates to the weight cut. That does not mean he wouldn’t be able to make 155. 145, I just think it’s unhealthy. To go back down to that weight class would just be unhealthy.

“But 155 is doable and something I know he’s keen on doing again so that’s not out of the realm of possibility. But you can’t deny how comfortable he was 170. That was his normal frame. So not having to put your body through a rigorous weight cut, there’s something to be said about that.”

Conor McGregor appears set to be fighting at lightweight next as Dana White says he will be taking on the Khabib Nurmagomedov vs. Tony Ferguson winner. But, according to Attar, he wouldn’t rule out a welterweight fight in the meantime.

“I think that particularly if you’re able to keep your strength or improve your strength and your muscle mass, and more importantly be able to carry your weight to keep your speed and quickness and explosiveness, well then why not?” Attar said. “It’s all about how each individual athlete feels on the night and that’s the most important thing.

“Gaining a competitive advantage is not always having a size, height, speed advantage but also having the right mindset and the right energy come the night of competition. It’s really a subjective thing and you’ve got to leave it to each athlete to decide what’s best for them.”

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